Finding the grave of George Washington’s drummer boy

Greenmount's cemetery is largely abandoned.  Having filled nearly every plot by the turn of the 20th century, there began a mass exodus of the dead for the more tony Ferncliff Cemetery a few mile away.  Within a decade, the final resting place resembled more of a park than cemetery.
Greenmount’s cemetery is largely abandoned. Having filled nearly every plot by the turn of the 20th century, there began a mass exodus of the dead for the more tony Ferncliff Cemetery a few mile away. Within a decade, the final resting place resembled more of a park than cemetery.
Greenmount Cemetery is located between East High Street, East Main Street, Greenmount Avenue, and Florence Street in Springfield, Ohio. Greenmount has some of the few soldiers of the American Revolutionary War and the War of 1812 buried on its grounds. Most notable, the drummer boy named Merrifield "Little Daddy" Vicory was laid to rest in the cemetery and remains there today.
Greenmount Cemetery is located between East High Street, East Main Street, Greenmount Avenue, and Florence Street in Springfield, Ohio. Greenmount has some of the few soldiers of the American Revolutionary War and the War of 1812 buried on its grounds. Most notable, the drummer boy named Merrifield “Little Daddy” Vicory was laid to rest in the cemetery and remains there today.”Ohio archæological and historical quarterly”
Alex's uncle John, a school teacher and life-long resident, led us on the quest to find Merrifield Vicory's final resting spot. Alex and John found the grave hidden amongst some very overgrown hedges near the High Street side of the cemetery.
Alex’s uncle John, a school teacher and life-long resident, led us on the quest to find Merrifield Vicory’s final resting spot. Alex and John found the grave hidden amongst some very overgrown hedges near the High Street side of the cemetery.
Although a challenge to find, Alex and John manage to spot the grave and it's legend that Merrifield served  as General George Washington's drummer boy during the Revolutionary War.
Although a challenge to find, Alex and John manage to spot the grave and it’s legend that Merrifield served as General George Washington’s drummer boy during the Revolutionary War.
MERRIFIELD VICORY was a drummer boy in the Revo-  lutionary War, and had his drum shot out from his side at the Siege  of Yorktown, later receiving a pension for his services in the conflict.  He was an odd but genial character. He located in Springfield  in 1814; he was a short, round man, with a jolly face, and soon  became known as "Little Daddy Vicory."  He did not lack  courage, as will be seen from the following narrative. "Early  on a Sunday morning, while living in Springfield, he discovered  a thief stealing bacon from his smoke-house ; securing a rope he  caught the thief and tied him securely until the hour when people  were on their way to church, when he drove him to the Presby-  terian Meeting-House, under the persuasive influence of a large  club, with two sides of bacon tied to his shoulders, taking him  to the door of the church he asked the people, there assembled, if  they claimed him as one of their members. This was such a  humiliating lesson that the thief, upon being released, disappeared  and never was seen in the town again."  Soon after locating in  Springfield, Merrifield Vicory bought ten acres of the land on  what afterward became the east end of High Street. He died  in March, 1849, in the seventy-eighth year of his age, and was  buried with military honors in Greenmount Cemetery.  "Ohio Archæological and Historical Quarterly"
MERRIFIELD VICORY was a drummer boy in the Revo-
lutionary War, and had his drum shot out from his side at the Siege
of Yorktown, later receiving a pension for his services in the conflict.
He was an odd but genial character. He located in Springfield
in 1814; he was a short, round man, with a jolly face, and soon
became known as “Little Daddy Vicory.”
He did not lack
courage, as will be seen from the following narrative. “Early
on a Sunday morning, while living in Springfield, he discovered
a thief stealing bacon from his smoke-house ; securing a rope he
caught the thief and tied him securely until the hour when people
were on their way to church, when he drove him to the Presby-
terian Meeting-House, under the persuasive influence of a large
club, with two sides of bacon tied to his shoulders, taking him
to the door of the church he asked the people, there assembled, if
they claimed him as one of their members. This was such a
humiliating lesson that the thief, upon being released, disappeared
and never was seen in the town again.”
Soon after locating in
Springfield, Merrifield Vicory bought ten acres of the land on
what afterward became the east end of High Street. He died
in March, 1849, in the seventy-eighth year of his age, and was
buried with military honors in Greenmount Cemetery.
“Ohio Archæological and Historical Quarterly”
Nothing quenches history detectives more than a trip afterward to a Big Boy restaurant.
Nothing quenches history detectives more than a trip afterward to a Big Boy restaurant.
Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Finding the grave of George Washington’s drummer boy

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s