South Park-The real and unanimated one

Southpark, after flying into Denver, was the first stop on our month long exploration of the American West.   Although not technically a town but a collection of mostly moved historic buildings outside of Fairplay, Colorado, Southpark City provides a genuine glimpse of a nineteenth century Rocky Mountain mining town. The area, at over 8,500' lies in a fairly lush valley supplied by three forks of the South Platte River and the site of countless encounters between native Ute's, invading Spanish, Americans like Zeb Pike, fur trappers, traders, cattle ranchers, and in 1859-gold seekers.
Southpark, after flying into Denver, was the first stop on our month long exploration of the American West.
Although not technically a town but a collection of mostly moved historic buildings outside of Fairplay, Colorado, Southpark City provides a genuine glimpse of a nineteenth century Rocky Mountain mining town.
The area, at over 8,500′ lies in a fairly lush valley supplied by three forks of the South Platte River and the site of countless encounters between native Ute’s, invading Spanish, Americans like Zeb Pike, fur trappers, traders, cattle ranchers, and in 1859-gold seekers.
One of only six buildings to be situated in their original sites, the Summer Saloon was constructed of native sandstone and pine from the nearby hills in 1879. The saloon is set up to reflect the usual trappings of a western saloon: A full bar, tables for poker, an upright piano, a rooms above for sleeping and entertaining.
One of only six buildings to be situated in their original sites, the Summer Saloon was constructed of native sandstone and pine from the nearby hills in 1879.
The saloon is set up to reflect the usual trappings of a western saloon: A full bar, tables for poker, an upright piano, a rooms above for sleeping and entertaining.
Alex bellies up to the bar in South Park City, Colorado.
Alex bellies up to the bar in South Park City, Colorado.
Hunting trophies loom over many of the public and private rooms in South Park City.
Hunting trophies loom over many of the public and private rooms in South Park City.
The home of Colonel Frank Mayer-a Civil War veteran, author, and buffalo hunter features an original restored Marquart wood-burning stove in the kitchen.
The home of Colonel Frank Mayer-a Civil War veteran, author, and buffalo hunter features an original restored Marquart wood-burning stove in the kitchen.
Large and comfortable by 19th century standards, this home featured cozy bedrooms and pot-bellied stoves.
Large and comfortable by 19th century standards, this home featured cozy bedrooms and pot-bellied stoves.

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Built in Denver just before the first World War, this 1914 Porter Mogul narrow gauge locomotive was used by the Denver South Park and Pacific Railroad for both passengers and cargo.
Built in Denver just before the first World War, this 1914 Porter Mogul narrow gauge locomotive was used by the Denver South Park and Pacific Railroad for both passengers and cargo.
Every steam locomotive needed plenty of water to boil to produce power from the coal-burning engines.
Every steam locomotive needed plenty of water to boil to produce power from the coal-burning engines.
Many western towns had raised wooden sidewalks to keep citizens out of the mud and worse on town streets.
Many western towns had raised wooden sidewalks to keep citizens out of the mud and worse on town streets.
No visit to South Park is complete without mentioning the town's connection to the subversive and highly satirical cable television cartoon on Comedy Central.   Outside the gates of the historic town museum, which look familiar if you have watched the show,  is a small store featuring t-shirts, posters, and characters from the show. Aside from that, the town has obviously mixed feelings about the connection.   The creators of the show, Trey Parker and Matt Stone, used Fairplay as the model for their mostly fictional look at modern life in a rural Colorado town.
No visit to South Park is complete without mentioning the town’s connection to the subversive and highly satirical cable television cartoon on Comedy Central.
Outside the gates of the historic town museum, which look familiar if you have watched the show, is a small store featuring t-shirts, posters, and characters from the show. Aside from that, the town has obviously mixed feelings about the connection.
The creators of the show, Trey Parker and Matt Stone, used Fairplay as the model for their mostly fictional look at modern life in a rural Colorado town.
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